Syllabus

The Faculty of Medicine of Adam University offers a centrally governed, integrated, inter-disciplinary curriculum that emphasizes problem-solving and self-directed learning.

COURSE CATALOGUE 560001 “GENERAL MEDICINE”

Introduction

The  Faculty of Medicine of Adam University  offers a centrally governed, integrated, inter-disciplinary curriculum that emphasizes problem-solving and self-directed learning. Courses meeting the degree requirements for the First Professional Medicine Program are available to those students who have been selected by the school’s admission committee.

Review of academic or financial policies and/or curricular requirements may result in changes to rules and/or policies that are published in this document, which is updated annually.

All students are expected to be familiar with the policies of Faculty of Medicine Adam University.

It should be recognized that all information in the catalog and handbook are subject to revision, and, from time to time, changes are made in course offerings, academic rules and the plan of instruction. Information contained herein supersedes that previously published and is subject to change.

Adam University’s policy is to make decisions on the basis of the individual’s qualifications to contribute to Harvard’s educational objectives and institutional needs. The principle of not discriminating against individuals on the basis of race, color, sex, sexual orientation, religion, age, national or ethnic origin, political beliefs, veteran status, or disability unrelated to job or course of study requirements is consistent with the purpose of a university and the law Kyrgyz Republic.

THE LIST OF SUBJECTS

  1. RUSSIAN LANGUAGE
  2. P H I L O S O P H Y
  3. ENGLISH LANGUAGE
  4. LATIN( FOREIGN LANGUAGE)
  5. HISTORY OF KYRGHYSTAN
  6. HISTORY OF MEDICINE
  7. ECONOMICS
  8. Mathematics and Informatics
  9. PHYSICS
  10. CHEMISTRY
  11. Biology with elements of Ecology
  12. General and clinical biochemistry
  13. ANATOMY
  14. HISTOLOGY
  15. NORMAL PHYSIOLOGY
  16. MICROBIOLOGY
  17. PATHOLOGICAL ANATOMY
  18. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY
  19. PHARMACOLOGY
  20. GENERAL HYGIENE
  21. SOCIAL MEDICINE AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT
  22. EPIDEMIOLOGY
  23. FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING
  24. RADIODIAGNOSTICS AND RADIOTHERAPY
  25. THERAPEUTIC PHYSICAL TRAINING
  26. MEDICINAL CONTROL
  27. INFECTIOUS DISEASES AND TROPICAL MEDICINE
  28. PSYCHIATRY AND SUBSTANCE USE DISORDERS
  29. SKIN AND VENEREAL DISEASES
  30. MEDICAL GENETICS
  31. NEUROLOGY AND NEUROSURGERY
  32. Otorhinolaryngology diseases
  33. OPHTHALMOLOGY
  34. SECTION COURSE
  35. CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY
  36. ALLERGOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY
  37. FAMILY MEDICINE
  38. NTERNAL DISEASES
  39. GENERAL PHYSIOTHERAPY
  40. ENDOCRINOLOGY
  41. HEMATOLOGY
  42. PHTHISIOPULMONOLOGY
  43. OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES
  44. SURGICAL DISEASES
  45. PEDIATRIC SURGERY

RUSS 101, 102  Russian language

GOAL: to learn language as a tool of communication and become proficient in profession.

STUDENT SHOULD KNOW:

  1. Rules of articulation and spelling, basic phonetically rules of Russian.
  2. Part of speech, basic grammatical category of Russian.
  3. 3 .Basic phrases, scientific phrases
  4. Lexical minimum of the program, basic speech themes, and communication situations.

STUDENT SHOULD BE SKILLED IN:

  1. To understand orally content of monologue and dialogue. To compose oral and written, coherent phrases independently.
  2. То start and to hold a conversation in different situations and with different goals.
  3. To take part in the dialogue – doctor-patient and write down the information in
  4. Medical chart.

CONTENT OF COURSE:

Phonetics  and  script.  Alphabet.  Word  and  syllable.  Accent  and  rhythmics.  Rules  of articulation. Main inflection types. Composition of the word. Conception of basis of the word; basis of the word and ending of the word; root of the word; prefix and suffix.  Noun.  Animate  and  inanimate  nouns.  Gender  and  number  of  nouns.  Declension  of nouns.  Pronoun.   Meaning.  Case  form.  Using  of  interrogative   pronoun,  personal  pronoun, indefinite pronoun, relative pronoun, possessive pronoun, negative pronoun. Adjective. Full and short adjectives. Verb. Infinitive. Perfect and imperfect verbs. The present tense, past tense and future tense. 1 and 2 Conjugation of verbs. Inclination of verbs. Verbal management. Verbs which are ending by -ся .Verb of movement, with prefixes and without prefixes. Numeral. Cardinal and ordinal numerals. Adverb, participle, adverbial participle. Auxiliary   parts   of   speech.   Preposition.   Conjunction   and   connection   words,   their meanings. Particles, their meanings. Syntax. Types of simple sentences. Main models of simple sentences. Active and passive constructions. Sequence of words in sentence. Types of composite sentences. Direct and indirect speeches. Main constructions of scientific style of speech.

METHODS OF ESTIMATION: oral interview, testing, written examination.

LITERATURE:

  1. Levina G.M., Vladimir-2 Intensive course of the Russian language: audio course – 2003;
  2. Anikina M.N., The ladder begins to learn Russian. The book is a workshop – 2008;
  3. Way to Russia – 2011.

ENGL 101, 102 English Language

GOAL: to develop the students’ communication skills and to practice their business skills in English that will take them well-prepared into their career.

STUDENTS SHOULD DEMONSTRATE THE ABILITY TO:

  1. Write a five-paragraph cause and effect essay.
  2. Comprehend and interpret advanced level texts, talks, and lectures related to health sciences in general.
  3. Research a topic using the library and the Internet.
  4. Take notes and organize them.
  5. Prepare and give a formal oral presentation using visual aids; communicate ideas orally in a clear manner.
  6. Write a short research paper with correct referencing.
  7. Comprehend and use new vocabulary words assigned for vocabulary expansion.
  8. Identify language errors and edit written work

CONTENT OF COURSE:

The course of General English is designed for adult learners whose command of English ranges from  high school to college level and who need to improve both their understanding and active use of English in real-time communication. It will also give the students a chance to practice their business skills in English that will tatlr them well-prepared into their career. The  course  consists  of  units  including  communicative  and  general  topics.  Each  unit contains  texts  and  dialogues  with  a sequence  of exercises  leading the  student from  passive asquisition to an active use of English. The  course  includes  presentations  followed  by  discussions,  role  play,  writing  essays, individual/group assignments. Question forms.  Present Simple.  Past Simple. Time  phrases often  used  in the  past (in, on,  at, ago). Modal Verbs. Real life: making requests and asking for permission. Present Continuous (and Present Simple). Present Perfect and Past Simple. Using articles. Visiting a Doctor. When and If sentences. Past Continuous. Health problems: how much do you know? 3resent  Perfect Simple  and  Continuous with  the  “unfinished  past”. Jobs and  personal charecteristics. Past Perfect. Reported speech. Conditional sentences. People in politics, religion and public life.

METHODS OF ESTIMATION: Written paper and oral presentation.

LITERATURE:

  1. Proffessional English in Use Medicine. Eric H. GLendinning, 2015;
  2. Sarah Cunningham. Cutting edge. Pearson Education Limited, 2001;
  3. Raymond Murphy. Essential Grammar in Use. Cambridge University Press, 1994;
  4. Kymyz, Computers, Customs & Other Writings. United Nations Development Program, 1995.

PHIL 101, Philosophy

Semester: I

GOAL: This module provides an introduction to analytic philosophy of medicine. As such, the aims of the module are: to note that there is a degree of continuity between philosophy of medicine and general philosophy of science; to argue that  careful consideration of historical and pragmatic factors are generally a significant part of doing good philosophy of medicine; to prepare students for further study of this subject. 

STUDENT SHOULD KNOW:

  1. Value of philosophical knowledge in modern culture;
  2. Historical types of philosophy and be able to guided in a huge set of opinions and concepts, beliefs and values;
  3. Philosophical concepts and categories as tools of philosophical knowledge; 

STUDENT SHOULD BE SKILLED IN:

  1. Disclose interrelations between the different phenomena of reality;
  2. Own philosophical tools and to be guided in sociocultural knowledge;
  3. Identify from where the modern ideas appeared and where they conduct, to comprehend the phenomenon reason;
  4. Think right, separating the main problems from minor;
  5. Develop ability to understanding of other person;
  6. Approach consciously life;
  7. Know about conditions of formation of the personality, to seek for personal and professional self-development;

CONTENT OF COURSE:

Basic conceptions of logic. What logic is? Deductive and inductive evaluation. Validity и verity. Consequence. Logic of Statement. Logical law. The law of contradiction. The law of excluded middle. The law of identity. Double negation etc. Logical inference Argument and Disproof. Conception of argument and its structure. Direct and indirect proof.  Mistakes of argumentation. Sophisms. Propositional Calculus. Formal and natural languages. The language of propositional calculus, connective indicators, conditions, truth table, schematic vocabulary, modus ponens, modus tollens, hypothetical syllogism, disjunctive syllogism, constructive dilemma, destructive dilemma, simplification, conjunctions, addition. Rules of truth argumentation. Rules of inference, rules of replacement. Philosophy, as a subject and its role in society. Philosophy of ancient India and China. Philosophy of Ancient Greece. Philosophy of Medieval and Renaissance. Philosophy of XVII century. German classic philosophy. Non classic Philosophy of XIX-XX century.

METHODS OF ESTIMATION: Written paper and oral presentation.

LITERATURE:

  1. Introduction to Philosophy for Medical Students and Other Busy People”-2012;
  2. Durant W. “The story of philosophy” Part-1 – 2010;
  3. Durant W. “The story of philosophy” Part-1 – 2010.

HIST 101, History of Kyrgystan 

GOAL: to teach students history of Kyrgyz Republic in context of general development of humankind.

STUDENT SHOULD KNOW:

  1. The main methods of historical research.
  2. 2. Scientific connection of history with other
  3. The main types of civilization and culture.
  4. The main periods of history Kyrgyz Republic people.
  5. 5. The main phases of genesis of the
  6. 6. Important dates and famous

STUDENTS SHOULD BE SKILLED IN:

  1. Using methods of historical research in practice.
  2. Using methods of research of other
  3. Knowing important dates and periods of native
  4. Having clear notion about historical geography of native history

CONTENT OF COURSE:

The subject of history and methods of historical research. Functions of historical analysis and problems of general development of humankind. Types of civilizations and cultures and problems of their interaction. History and other kindred humanities. The main schools of science of history. The main periods of native history. Problems of dividing into periods of native history and localization of historical geography of the subject of study. History and state ideology. The development of native culture in the process of history. Periods of development of culture in native history. Using folklore data in historical research. “Manas” epos in history of the Kyrgyz.

METHODS OF ESTIMATION: Written paper and oral presentation.

LITERATURE:

  1. History of Kyrgyzstan: Göktürks, Yuezhi, Soviet Central Asia, Tulip Revolution, Saka, Wusun, Battle of Talas, Zhetysu, Moghulistan, 2010;
  2. Akerov T. Historical Atlas of Central Asia, 2012;
  3. Yuri Historical Atlas of Central Asia. Indiana University Press, 2003.

HIST 201, HISTORY OF MEDICINE

GOAL: to acquaint students with the history of medicine. 

STUDENT SHOULD KNOW:

  1. Main stages and common regularities of formation and development of doctoring and medicine in different countries from a primitive society to present.
  2. Differences of doctoring and medicine between different periods.
  3. Progress of biggest civilizations in doctoring and medicine during the development of spiritual culture.

STUDENTS SHOULD BE SKILLED IN:

  1. to analyze the historical material and understand the historical process of development of doctoring and medicine from a primitive society until now.
  2. to understand the logics and common regularities of the development of medical thought and activity in different periods and to apply this knowledge in practice.
  3. to conduct a discussion correctly about main questions of the general history of medicine.
  4. to use this knowledge in clinical practice and communications with patients.
  5. to improve and make deeper the knowledge of the history of medicine.
  6. to strive for improvement of the private standard of culture.
  7. to follow the ideas of humanity and values common to all mankind.

CONTENT OF COURSE:

Stages of development of medicine. Source for the studying of medicine and pharmacy.  The development of doctoring during the formation flowering and decay of primitive society. Introduction in the course. Doctoring in a primitive society. Doctoring in the countries of the ancient East. Characteristics of the epoch and periodization. Doctoring in Shumer (history, development of medical knowledge). Doctoring in Babylon. Doctoring in Assyria, ancient Egypt. Doctoring and medicine in ancient India and ancient China. Doctoring and medicine in the countries of the ancient Mediterranean (in a classical antiquity). Doctoring in the ancient world. Doctoring in the ancient Greece and ancient Rome. Medicine of the periods of the early (V-X c) and advanced (XI-XV c.) Middle Ages. Medicine of the Renaissance. Scholastic medicine. First Medical High Schools, epidemics. Medicine of a modern history (after 1918).General Stages of development of medicine of this time.  Scientifical Medical Schools. Achievement of medico-biologic science and development of clinical disciplines. The development of hygiene and public medicine. International Organizations. The history of development of medicine of Kyrgyzstan. General stages of development of medicine in Kyrgyzstan. Condition of medicine. Health Protection Laws. Health reforming (“Manas” program).

METHODS OF ESTIMATION: Written paper and oral presentation.

LITERATURE:

  1. Zabludovski P.E. History of medicine, 1981
  2. Stochic A.M. Selected lections about development of history of medicine and culturology, 1991
  3. Mirski M.B. Surgery from ancient world until now, 2000

ECON 101, ECONOMICS

GOAL: to be orientated  in the economical relations, which  have emerged in the process of carrying out professional activity.

STUDENT SHOULD KNOW:

  1. Basic concepts of economics.
  2. Microeconomics: supply, demand and product markets. Markets system and factors.
  3. Macroeconomics: the study of economic growth and business cycles.
  4. Unemployment, inflation and economic policy. The economic role of government.
  5. International economics and the world economy
  6. Introduction to health economics. Elementary economic evaluation in health care.
  7. Principles of health economics for developing countries.
  8. Peculiarities of health enterprise. Formation and further development of medical
  9. insurance.

STUDENTS SHOULD BE SKILLED IN:

  1. To know basic concepts of economics.
  2. To know and analyze microeconomics issues and market factors: the economics of the firm and resource allocation.
  3. То know and analyze macroeconomic issues and study economic growth and business cycles.
  4. To be orientated in the fundamentals of economic relations in health care service and determine demand and proposal for health care service
  5. To analyze economic and social effectiveness of health care and develop economics behavior in health care practice.

CONTENT OF COURSE:

The nature and method of economics. The fundamentals of economics. Scarcity and efficiency. The three problems of economic organization. Inputs and outputs. Markets and government in a modern economy. The economic role of government. Microeconomics: supply, demand and product markets. Analysis of equilibrium and costs. Competitive markets, monopoly, and oligopoly. Factor markets. Market and economic efficiency. Macroeconomics: business cycles, economic growth, and macroeconomic policy. Consumption and investment. Money, banking, and financial markets. Central banking and monetary policy. Unemployment, inflation, and economic policy. Introduction to health economics. Elementary economics evaluation in health care. Principles of health economics for developing countries. Peculiarities of health enterprise.

Formation and further development of medical insurance.

METHODS OF ESTIMATION: Written paper and testing.

LITERATURE:

  1. “Economics” by A. Samuelson, W.D. Nordhaus, 17th edition, 2001
  2. “Macroeconomics” by R.McConnel, S. L. Brue, 2000

 LAT 201, Latin and Medical Terminology

Semester I, II

Goal: to teach students to: Read and write words of Latin and Greek origin correctly. Disclose the meaning of medical terms and construct terms on its posing elements. Translate prescriptions with names of pharmaceutical dosage forms, plants, agents and chemical compounds. Parts of speech, basic grammar category of Latin.

STUDENTS SHOULD DEMONSTRATE THE ABILITY TO:

  1. Rules of reading. Diphthongs. Digraphs.
  2. Names of pharmaceutical plants, of chemical compounds, dosage forms and agents.
  3. Prescription and its structure.
  4. Fundamentals of medical, anatomical, clinical, and pharmaceutical terminology.
  5. Parts of speech, basic grammar category of Latin.

CONTENT OF COURSE:

Introduction.  History  of  Latin  –  briefly.  Alphabet.  Diphthongs.  Digraphs. Survey  of  5  noun’s  declensions.  Dictionary  form  of  nouns.  The  structure  of anatomical term which consists of 2 words. Adjective. Elements  of Noun.  The structure of anatomical term which consists of 3 and more words. Plural form of nouns and adjectives, of nominative and genitive cases. Morphology. Verb. Using of verbs and prepositions in the prescription. The  structure  of  pharmaceutical  term.  Abbreviations  in  the  prescription. Prescription and is structure. Chemical and pharmacological nomenclature. Names of chemical elements. Word formation. Common used Latin prefixes and Greek suffixes. Common used Greek cognate words and terms. Clinical  terminology:  names  organs  of  the   body,  diseases  of  the  body,  pathologic, terminology of body systems.

METHODS OF ESTIMATION: testing, written examination.

LITERATURE:

  1. Chernyavski M. N. Latin and fundamentals of medical terminology.
  2. Shultz J. F. Latin and fundamentals of medical terminology.

COMP 101, INFORMATIC SUBJECT

GOAL: to teach  students how to  use applied  programs packages as qualified  users and knowledge of statistic processing of medical-biological information.

STUDENTS SHOULD DEMONSTRATE THE ABILITY TO

  1. Determine which problems in health care practice are appropriate to address, including ethical and safety positions, by using computerised methods for visualisation and analysis
  2. Account for how practices within health care can be supported by computerised tools
  3. Select and apply appropriate methods, e.g. from image analysis, for addressing specific problems in health care
  4. Describe how the requirements of different stakeholders within health care (e.g. physicians, nurses, lab analysts) can be studied and fulfilled
  5. Describe the challenges in designing advanced data analysis and information systems for health care practice
  6. Account for the challenges in deploying and using advanced data analysis and information systems in health care practice

CONTENT OF COURSE:

This course presents an overview of medical informatics and its main applications. Primary topics include: Reasons for necessity of systematically processing data, information and knowledge in medicine and health care, benefits and current constraints of using information and communication technology in medicine and health care, medical informatics as a discipline, medical data and records, coding classification, database and reference models, interfaces, data acquisition, processing and exchange standards, medical knowledge, decision and diagnostic support, medical information systems, administrative, clinical and ancillary information systems, implementations and evaluations, telemedicine and internet applications, efficient and responsible use of information processing tools to support health care professionals practice and their decision making.

METHODS OF ESTIMATION: testing, written examination. 

LITERATURE:

  1. Calculus and analytic geometry. Thomas, George Brinton, David Pallar. M asachusets,1990
  2. Information and mastery. Judis A., Chavi, Koff. – 2002

M-PHYS 202, MEDICAL PHYSICS 

GOAL: to teach  students how basics of physical effects of the sound,  ionizing  and  inducted  radiation  on  human  organism  and  animals.

STUDENTS SHOULD DEMONSTRATE THE ABILITY TO:

  1. Make basic physical measurements, process measurements results with the use of computing
  2. Work on electricity operated medical equipment envisaged in the type listing.

CONTENT OF COURSE:

Bioelectrogenesis. Electric and magnetic qualities of tissue  and  surrounding environment. Bioelectrical potentials. Electrography of tissues and organs. Direct  current therapy. Magnetic qualities of substances. Magnetic biology and biomagnetism. Physical basics of magnetic cardiography. Influence on tissues of: high frequency current, alternating magnetic field of high and ultrahigh frequency, electric field of ultrahigh frequency,  electro-magnetic waves of super high and extremely high frequency ranges. Medical electronics. Elements of quantum physics. The use of lasers in  biological  research  and medicine. Laser devices for coagulation and processing of tissues. Electronic paramagnetic resonance, its use in biology and medicine. Nuclear magnetic resonance, tomography. Ionizing  radiation.  Basics  of  dosimetry.  The  use  of  ionizing  radiations  in  medicine. Dosimetr of ionizing radiation. Optics. Optical system  of the eye. Accomodation. Angle of vision. Permissive capability.  Optical system disadvantages and their correction with lenses. Optical microscopy. Human body radiation. The use of thermography for diagnostic purposes. Structure of thermograph andjthermovisor.

METHODS OF ESTIMATION:  testing, written examination. 

LITERATURE:

  1. Advanced Level Physics. 7-th edition. Michel Nelkon, Philip Parker. Heinemann, 1995, part 1-2, part 3-4. 1997

CHEM 101, CHEMISTRY

GOAL: to give systemic knowledge to students about physico-chemical processes developing in living organisms.

STUDENTS SHOULD DEMONSTRATE THE ABILITY TO

  1. Conduct chemical experiments and complete protocols of chemical experiments.
  2. Маке  physico-chemical  measurements  characterizing  certain  features  of  solutions,mixtures and other objects, which shape interior environment of organism.

CONTENT OF COURSE:

Elements of chemical thermodynamics. The first of thermodynamics. Enthalpy. Application of the  first  law  of thermodynamics to biosystems. The second law of thermodynamics. Reversible and irreversible processes from the thermodynamic standpoint. Enthropy. Gibbs energy enzymatic kinetics. Catalysis. Peculiarities of catalytical activitiy of enzymes. The equation of Michaelis-Menten and its analysis. Solutions. The role of water and solutions in vital  functions. Osmolality and osmolarity  of  biologic  liquids  and  perfusive solutions. Buffer action – basic mechanism  of protolitic homeostasis of organism. Buffer systems action mechanism, their qualitative characteristics. Calculation of pH, of protolitic systems. Buffer systems of blood. Acidic-basic condition of organism in normal and pathological condition,  correction  of  pathological condition. The use of neutralization reactions in pharmacotherapy: medicines with acidic and basic properties. Oxidizing-reductive processes. Physico-chemical principles of transportation of electrons within the electrotransportation chain of mitochondria. Biogenic elements.  Biosphere,  rotation  of biogenic elements.  Classification  of biogenic elements according to their functional roles. Chemical aspects of environment. Chemistry of s-block elements. Chemistry of p-block elements. Chemistry of d-block elements. Classification of disperse system. Obtaining and features of disperse systems. Stability of disperse systems. Features of solution of biopolymers. Classification and nomenclature of organic substances. Spatial structure of organic compounds. The connection between special structure and biological activity. Classification of organic reactions. The concept on reaction mechanisms. Acidic-basic interactions. Reactive capability of organic compounds: alcohols, tyols, amines, aldehydes, ketons, carbon acids and their derivatives. Polyfunctional and heterocyclical compounds. Alcaloids, vitamins of heterocyclical nature. Biopolimers  and  their  structural  components.  Aminoacids,  peptides,  proteins.  Nucleic acids. Saponified and unsaponified lipids.

METHODS OF ESTIMATION:  testing, written examination.

LITERATURE:

  1. Chemistry. Prescott Ch. – 2000
  2. General Chemistry. John B. Russell – 1992

BIOL 101, GENERAL BIOLOGY WITH FUNDAMENTALS OF ECOLOGY

GOAL: the formation of basic knowledge about biodiversity, the role of man in nature.

STUDENTS SHOULD DEMONSTRATE THE ABILITY TO

  1. Use biological microscope.
  2. Determine microscopical cell organells.
  3. Resolve genetical tasks without any assistance.

CONTENT OF COURSE:

Origin and diversity of life. The system of classification  of the organic world. Five kingdoms of organic world: prokaryotes, protests, plants, mushrooms, animals. Synthetic theory of evolution. Theory of A.oparin. The origin of species according to Ch.Darwin’s theory. The role of the elementary evolutionary factors in the creation of biodiversity. Adaptation of organisms and evolutionary selection. Micro- and macroevolution. Cell biology. The cell organization of living matter. Structure of th e cell. Similarity and differences of plant and animal cells. The structure and morphology of chromosomes. Medical helmintology and arachnoentomology. Type Plathelminthes. The Flat worms, tape worms, round worms. Epidemiological meaning of Phylum Artropoda. Crustaceans and Arachnids. Insects. Prevention and control. Anthropogenesis. Place of Homo sapience in the animal world. Basic stages of anthropogenesis. Dryopithecus, Australopithecus, skilled man – Homo habilis. Ancient people: Neanderthalens, modern people, cro-magnon man. Modern races. Popultion structure of spieces and humanity. Decreasing of the role of the natural selection, increasing of socialfactors ( social labour, speech, literature, consciousness) during the process of anthropogenesis. Fundemantals of general ecology and human ecology. Human adaptational problems to environmental conditions. Biosphere and the man. Noosphere – th e supreme stage of biosphere evolution.

METHODS OF ESTIMATION:  testing, written examination.

LITERATURE:

  1. Lodish H. et al. Molecular Cell Biology. Freeman & Co., New York, 2000, 2003, 2007, 2012.
  2. Gilbert S. Developmental Biology. Sinauer Associates, Sunderland (MA), 2000, 2003, 2006, 2010, 2013.
  3. Janeway C.A., P. Travers, M. Walport, M.J. Shlomchik. Immunobiology. Garland Science, New York, 2001, 2004.

CHEM 201, BIOCHEMISTRY 

GOAL: are expected to know the important principles of inter and  intramolecular interactions, enzyme catalysis, thermodynamics, and pH.

STUDENTS SHOULD DEMONSTRATE THE ABILITY TO

  1. Make use of conventional techniques/instruments to perform biochemical analysis relevant to clinical screening and
  2. To know the structures and functions of important biochemical metabolites, including amino acids, monosaccharides, nucleic acids and the general structures of fatty acids, triacylglycerols, membrane lipids and cholesterol. Students are expected to know the following pathways in depth:
  3. Analyze and interpret investigative data.

CONTENT OF COURSE:

Tools of biochemistry. Methods of purification and separation of amino acids, plasma orotein and lipoproteins (dialysis, chromatography, electrophoresis). Methods of qualitative determination of substances in the biological fluids (photometry-colorimetric and titration methods). Chemistry of proteins. General nature of amino acids, various ways of amino acids dassification. Biologically important peptides. Structure, classification  and  properties  of proteins. Diseases altered protein conformation (prione disease, Alzheimer’s disease). Short characteristics of conjugated proteins. Plasma proteins. Functions, clinical significance of varies fractions. Laboratory practice: Determination of s-total protein.Hemoglobin. Chemistry and functions. Types of normal and abnormal hemoglobins. Hemoglobin derivatives. Hemoglobinopathies. Thalassemia. Porphyrias.  Enzymes. General nature, classification, specificity, mechanism  of  action,  factors affecting enzyme activity, regulation of enzyme activity. Enzymes and isoenzymes in clinical diagnosis and therapy. Vitamins. Hormones.General nature, classification, sources, active form and  metabolic role, deficiency manifestations, daily requirement and hypervitaminosis. General characteristics and mechanism of hormone action (through expression of gene, through the second messenger systems). Biological oxidation. Carbohydrate metabolism General concept of oxidation and reduction. Electron transport chain. Substrate level and oxidative phosphorylation. Role of uncouplers and inhibitors. Biochemical aspects of digestion and absorption of carbohydrates. Glycolysis, Rapoport-Lumbering cycle, citric acid cycle. Gluconeogenesis. Cori cycle. HMP pathway and its biological significance. Glycogenesis. Glycogenolysis. Glycogenosis.  Regulation of blood glucose level. Hypo- and hyperglycemia. Metabolism of fructose, galactose, clinical aspects. Chemistry of conjugated carbohydrates: proteoglycans and glycoproteins.  Lypogenesis. Ketogenesis, ketolysis, ketosis. Cholesterol biosynthesis. Bile acids. Bile salts. Cholelithiasis. Lipoproteins metabolism. Pathology of lipid metabolism: atherosclerosis, fatty liver, hypo- and hyperlipoproteinemia. Amino acids and protein metabolism. Digestion and absorption of protein. Fate of amino acids in the body.Fates of ammonia (urea cycle, glutamate formation). Metabolism of aromatic and sulphur containing amino acids. Metabolism of glycine. Nucleotides metabolism. Biosynthesis of purines (general and salvage pathways) and pyrimidines. Degradation of purines and pyrimidines. Uric acid metabolism. Clinical aspects. Clinical  biochemistry.  Biochemistry analysis in clinical  practice for diagnosis, prognosis.

METHODS OF ESTIMATION:  testing, written examination.

LITERATURE:

  1. Harper’s Illustrated Biochemistry
  2. Lippincott’s Illustrated Reviews: Biochemistry
  3. MN Chatterjea, Rana Shinde. Textbook of Medical Biochemistry

MED 201, ANATOMY

GOAL: recognize anatomical structures and explain the physiological functions of body systems.  Use anatomical knowledge to predict physiological consequences, and use knowledge of function to predict the features of anatomical structures.

STUDENTS SHOULD DEMONSTRATE THE ABILITY TO

  1. The arterial of the body can be palpated or compressed in a emergency.
  2. Demonstrate muscle and their movements at joints.
  3. Lacate and determine sites for: lumbar puncture, sternal puncture and pericardial tapping.
  4. Locate veins for venal puncture.
  5. Locate the site for emergency tracheostomy.

CONTENT OF COURSE:

Osteology. The skeleton. The vertebral column. The cervix, thoracic and lumbar.The sacrum and coccyx. The ribs and sternum. The pelvic girdle and the skeleton of the lower limb. Syndesmology. The joints of the trunk. The vertebral column as a whole. The skull and articulations of the skull bones. The skull, structure. The bones of the aeretral cranium. The occipital bone,frontal, shenoid and parietal bones. The temporal bone, the bones of the visceral cranium. The topography. External and surface of base of skull. The skull as a whole. Age features of the skull. Muscles of the trunk, the muscles of the head and neck. Anatomy of muscles. The  and fasciae of the head and neck. The muscles and fasciae of the chest. Muscles of the region of the shoulder joint and the muscles upper, lower limbs. Muscles ir  eg on of the shoulder joint. Anterior and posterior muscles of the upper arm. Muscles of the hip region. Canalis adductorius. The popleteal fossa. Sclanchnology. The digestive system. An oral cavity. Salivary glabds. Teeth. Pharynx,stomach. The small and large intestines . Liver. Gall blader. Pancreas.  Respiratory system. Nose cavity. Larynx. Trachea. Bronchi. The structure of Lungs.Urogenital system. Endocrine and immune system. The urinary system. The kidneys. The he urinary bladder. The urethra ( male, female). The internal and external genital.  The internal and external genital organs of the female. Nervous system. Introduction of neurology. General survey of spinal cord. The brain stem. Medulla oblongata. Pons. The rhomboid fossa. The cerebellum. The mesencephalon. The diencephalon. The third ventricle. The external and middle ears. The internal ear. The eyeball. Cardiovascular system. The heart and the main vessels. The aorta. The abdominal aorta. The portal vein. The system of vena cava inferior. The artery and veins upper and lower extremity. The lymphatic vessels. Plexus cervicalis and plexus brachalis. Formation innervation. The anterior branche of the thoracic nerves. The lumbar plexuses

The short branches sacral plexus. The long branches sacral plexus. «The vegetative nervous system». Ill, IV, VI, XI, XII pairs of the nerve. I, II, VIII pairs of the cranial nerve. V, VII, IX, X pairs of the cranial nerve. The and parasympathetic nervous systems.

METHODS OF ESTIMATION: oral interview, testing, written examination.

LITERATURE:

  1. Human Anatomy. B.D. Chaurasia’s. Volume one, v. two, v.three. First published
  2. CBS Publishers & Distributors.
  3. Clemente anatomy-international edition. A. Regoinal atlas of the human body. 4 th edition.
  4. Clinical anatomy for medical students / Richard S. Snell- Lipincort. Williams & Wilkins- 2000.

MED 205, HISTOLOGY

GOAL: to  study the thin  composition  of animal  and  human  organisms  at the  levels  of organs, tissues, cellular and subcellular (molecular) levels.

STUDENTS SHOULD DEMONSTRATE THE ABILITY TO:

  1. Make   histological   preparations   under   most  widely   used   techniques   (dying  with hematoxylin-losin, according to Romanovski’s method)
  2. Read through the microscope histological preparations, histological and embryological microphotographs and pictures, electronic microphotographs of cells and non-cellular structures of tissues and organs.

CONTENT OF COURSE:

History  of  development  of  histology,  cytology  and  embryology.  Methods  histological cytology, its components. General  embryology. The  concept of ontogenesis  and  philogenesis.  Stages of embryo development. Cellular surface. Cytoplasm, its components. The reproduction of cell division. The  tissues.  Epithelial  tissue.  Glands.  Connective  tissues.  Proper-connective  tissues. Special connective and its tissues properties. Blood and lymph. Skeletal connective tissues: cartilage, bone tissues. Muscular tissues. Classification. Development and structure. Nervous tissue. Histogenesis of nervous tissue and their classification. The nervous system. Development and structure of nervous  system’s  organs.  Spinal cord, spinal and vegetative ganglia. Structure and development of cerebrum cortex and the cerebellum. Sensory organs.  Development and structure of primary sensory cells.  Organs of vision eye and olfaction. The group of secondary sensory organs. The structure and development of the organ of hearing, balance and taste buds.

METHODS OF ESTIMATION:  testing, written examination.

LITERATURE:

  1. Histology. Viaters,1990
  2. Medical Histology, fourth edition, editor: Locud Hussain Siddiqui, 1999.

MED 203, NORMAL PHYSIOLOGY 

GOAL: provides an understanding how cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems function together to create one organism.

STUDENTS SHOULD DEMONSTRATE THE ABILITY TO:

  1. Conduct thermometry.
  2. Register and analyze electrocardiograms, phonocardiograms, arterial blood
  3. Examine the thorax, determine its form and respiration frequency, hear out pulmonary respiration.
  4. Determine vital volume of lungs and maximal respiration volume by method of Count p 02 and p C02 in atmospheric and alveolar air.
  5. Compose digestion scheme for buccal cavity, stomach, small and large intestines of
  6. Take blood sample from finger and analyze it according to all the necessary indicators.
  7. Conduct research and evaluation of visual, audile, verbal and logic memory

CONTENT OF COURSE:

Levels of morphofunctional organization of human organism. Basic methods of research in physiology. Homeostasis. Homeostatic parameters. Physiology,  composition  and  functions,  physico-chemical  properties  of  blood.  Shaped elements of blood. Hemoglobin. Hemostasis and its components. Antigenic blood systems. Humoral regulating system. Structural-functional organization of endocrine system. Biomembranes.  Transportation  of  substances  through  membranes.  Excitability  as  a oroperty of highly specialized substances. Bioelectric potentials. Physiology of nervous fibers and synapses. Basic characteristics of muscular activity. Physiology of central nervous system. Basic properties of neurons and central synapses. Particular physiology of central nervous system. Spinal cord, medulla oblongata and medium Cerebellum. Reticular formation. Basal ganglia. Limbic system. Cerebral hemisphere  cortex. Reflectory regulation of somatic and vegetative functions. Physiology of analyzers. Properties of analyzer systems. Common physiology of reception. Visual and audile analyzers. Vestibular analyzer. Metabolism   of  substances  and   energy  in  organism.   Physiology  of  nutrition.   Heat exchange and its regulation. Physiology of excretion. Mechanisms of urine production and its regulation. Physiology   of   cardiovascular   system.   Cardiocycle       and      its   phase   structure.        Basic ‘egularities of hemodynamics. Cardiovascular performance  regulation.  Specifics  of blood  circulation  in  kidneys,  gastrointestinal  tract,  main  digestive  glands. Physiology of respiration. External respiration, respiratory metabolism in lungs, “ransportation of gases by blood, gas exchange in tissues. Regulation of respiration. Hyper- and hypobaria. Hypoxia. The disease of mountains. Physiology of digestion. Integrative  activity of organism.  Physiology of higher nervous activity.  Conditional and -nconditional reflexes. Retardation in brain cortex. Analytical and synthetic activity of cerebral hemisphere cortex. Types of higher nervous activity in humans. Sleep and vigilance. Physiological basics of psychic functions. Adaptation   of  humans   to   different   environmental   conditions.

METHODS OF ESTIMATION:  testing, written examination.

LITERATURE:

  1. Jane S. Physiology part 1.2. 1990
  2. Janogs F. Physiology 1996
  3. R. Schmidt, H.Tevs  Human  physiology (translated  from  English).  In 4 volumes – М .,1986

BIOL 103, MICROBIOLOGY

GOAL: to teach  students  basic  knowledge  in the  area  of interaction  of macroorganism, microorganism and laboratory diagnosis of infection diseases.

STUDENTS SHOUlD DEMONSTRATE THE ABILITY TO

  1. То interpreted correctly the results of microbiological, virusological and serologic laboratory investigation and correlate the clinical manifestation with the etiological agent.
  2. Stain and investigate section of pure microbe culture and clinical smears under binocular light microscope.
  3. To have bacteriological work skills: elimination of pure cultures, identification of cultures by morphological, tinctorial, cultural, biochemical, antigenic characteristics.

CONTENT OF COURSE:

Subject and tasks of the medical microbiology, virology, immunology. History of microbiology. General microbiology, systemic m-gy including bacteriology, immunology, mycology, rickettsia chamydia phraseology. Morphology and ultrastrucure of bacteria, usesl of microorganisms and fungus. Physiology of bacteria of microorganisms (structure, nutrition, respiration, reproduction, growth, metabolism). Enzymes of bacteria chromogenesis, fluorescence of the germs. Peculiarities of virus reproduction, interaction between virus and host cell. Virogenia. Defective viruses. Bacteriophages. Principles and methods of cultivatiion of bacterias and viruses.Spreading of microbes in environment. Microflora of soil, air, w ater, food substance, human body. Environmental effects on germs: effects of physical, chemical, biological factors. Sterilization, disinfections, asepsis, antiseptics. Waste disposal. Definition  of  waste, classification, segregation, transport and disposal. Desensitization, introduction of medicines by Bezredko. Immunodeficiency states. Chemotherapy and chemoprophylaxis of infectious diseases. History of chemotherapy re.etopm ent. Main groups of antibacterial medicines, classification by chemical ctructure, sp-ectrum, and mechanism. Mechanism of bacterial  resistance.  Methods  of determination  of ant oiotic susceptibility of microorganisms. Pathogenes  of  suppurative   inflammational   diseases:  staphylococcus,  streptococcus,

-eningococcus, gonococcus. Pathogenes diphtheria, pertussi, tuberculosis. Pathogenes of enteric infection. Colon bacillus.  Pathogenes of typhoid,  paratyphoid  A and B, food poisoning, dysentery, cholera, gas gangrene, tetanus, botulism. Pathogenes of plague, rabbit fever, brucellosis, anthrax, and Q fever. Actinomycosis, Wocardia, Rickettsia, chlamydia, mycoplazma. Flu virus and ARD virus. General characterisics of enteroviruses. Viral hepatitis А, В, С, E, Д. HIV/ AIDS Arboviruses, rabies.

METHODS OF ESTIMATION: oral interview, testing, written examination.

LITERATURE

  1. Microbiology, Virology, Immunology, Bacteriology, Parasitology, Micology Online Richard Hunt et al, 2001 – T h e  Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina
  2. Microbiology for the Health Sciences, 7nt Ed; Gwendolyn RW. Burton, Paul G. Engelkirk; Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2003

ANAT 301, PATHOLOGICAL ANATOMY 

GOAL: study etiology, pathogenesis and morphological  characteristics  of  common diseases of organs and systems. 

STUDENTS SHOULD DEMONSTRATE THE ABILITY TO:

  1. Use light operated biological microscope.
  2. Diagnose macroscopic and histological features of pathological manifestations of common diseases. Methods of autopsy.

CONTENT OF COURSE:

Necrosis. Infarct.Plethora.  Anemia.  Bleeding.  Lymph  circulation  disorders. Embolism. Shock.Dystrophy.   Background.   Parenchymatose  dystrophies.  Stromal-vascular  dystrophies, rystrrophias. Exudative inflammation. Organic non-specific and organic specific epithelial tumors. Cancer of organs, a tumors. Tumors comprising melanin forming tissue. Pre-cancer conditions. Clinical-morphological classification. Histological forms, Hypertension disease. Ischemic heart disease. Etiology and pathogenesis. Complications, causes of death. General morphology. Rheumatism. Heart defects. Systemic lupus. Rheumatoid arthritis. Vasculitis. Cardiomyopathy. Acute pneumonias.Chronic lung disease. Etiology and pathogenesis. Dseases of digestive organs. Diseases of liver: hepatosis, hepatitis, cirrhosis. Diseases of kidneys: glomerulopathy, tubulopathy, nephrosclerosis. Typhoid.   Dysentery. Salmonellosis.  Extremely dangerous infections. Infantile bacterial infections. Infantile viral Acute respiratory viral infections. Complications, causes of death.

METHODS OF ESTIMATION: oral interview, testing, written examination.

LITERATURE:

  1. Pathology. Kumar, Rabin. –  1995
  2. Pathology fundamentals of diseases. Kortran, Kumar.-1999

MED 302, PATHOPHYSIOLOGY

GOAL: study principles, mechanisms processes, and teaching of basics of clinical thinking, for using the knowledge in future.

STUDENTS SHOULD DEMONSTRATE THE ABILITY TO:

  1. To evaluate critically modern theoretical conceptions and directions of
  2. To analyze problems of the general pathology and etical concepts and directions in medicine;
  3. To conduct pathologic analysis of clinic laboratory,
  4. To interpret of results of most widespread diagnostic methods;
  5. To solve clinic

CONTENT OF COURSE:

Fundamental conception of general nosology peers с factors of an environment.  Overheating and overcooling. Burn disease, etiopathogenesis. disorders of blood circulation and microcirculation. Etiopathogenesis of arterial hyperemia, ischemia, stasis. Pathology of hemostasis. Thrombosis, embolism, . Typical forms of immune disorders. Immunodeficiency states. Stages and pathogenesis of allergic reactions. Types of allergic.

Mechanisms of local and general clinical signs of an inflammation. Effects of biological active substances during inflammation. Etiopathogenesis of exudation and emigration of WBC to inflamed tissue. Etiology, pathogenesis. Types of febrile reactions, temperature curves. Pathogenetic principles of antipyretic therapy. Protein metabolism. Disorder of absorption, synthesis, depositing of in an organism. Etiopathogenesis hypo-, hyperglycemic conditions. Glucosuria. Hyper-, hypoglycemic comas, nd, therapeutic management.

METHODS OF ESTIMATION: oral interview, testing, written examination.

LITERATURE:

  1. Pathology. Kumar, Rabin. –  1995
  2. Pathology fundamentals of diseases. Kortran, Kumar.-1999

FARM 201, PHARMACOLOGICAL

STUDENTS SHOULD DEMONSTRATE THE ABILITY TO:

  1. Evaluate pharmacological effect of basic groups of medicines.
  2. Analyze  effects   of  medicines  on  the   strength   of  all  their   pharmacokinetic  and pharmacodynamic
  3. Assess toxic capacity of medicines and medicinal intoxication treatm ent methods.
  4. Prescribe medicines in various dosage forms.

CONTENT OF COURSE:

Pharmacodynamics: medicinal effect mechanisms Pharmacokinetics: basic principles, absorption and distribution of medicines. Prescription. Various dosage forms: soft, liquid, solid and dosage form for injections. Drugs affecting autonomous nervous system. Cholinergic drugs. Adrenergic drugs. Drugs affecting central nervous system: narcosis drugs, soporifics, antiepileptic and antiparkinsonik, neuroleptics, sedatives, antidepressants, psychostimulating and nootropic drugs, araeptics. Pharmacology of pain. Analgesics. Anti-inflammatory and anti-allergenic drugs. Immune pharmacology. Basic principles of chemiotherapy. Medicinal interaction. Transplacentary interaction. Complications and side effects of medicinal therapy. Special aspects of pediatric and geriatric pharmacology.

METHODS OF ESTIMATION: oral interview, testing, written examination.

LITERATURE:

  1. Pharmacology, Lippincott’s illustrated reviews, 2-nd edition
  2. Mary J.Mycek, Richard A.Harvey, Pamela C. Champe
  3. Essential of Medical Pharmacology by KD Tripathi, 5th Edition
  4. Basic&Clinical Pharmacology by Bertram G, Katzung

ANAT 302, TOPOGRAPHY ANATOMY AND OPERATIVE SURGERY

GOAL: to teach for knowledge, skills and abilities applying on the topographic anatomy

STUDENTS SHOULD DEMONSTRATE THE ABILITY TO:

  1. Topography anatomy and operative surgery correlation basis.
  2. View of vascular- nerve elaboration.
  3. View of internal, its sceletotopy, location, relation.
  4. To define and know exactly the individual human body boundaries.
  5. Surgery instruments (general surgical and the special)

STUDENTS SHOULD DEMONSTRATE THE ABILITY TO

  1. To apply  the  topography  anatomy  knowledge  for  reasoning  of  a  diagnosis, diseases processes, for choosing a management approaches and surgical measures.
  2. To use a general and special surgeon instruments.
  3. To do: a body-section  and  dissection  of  upper  and  lower  limbs,  head,  neck, breast, abdomen, pelvis; skin suture and intestinal seams; exposure and displacement of the nerve- vascular bundles of upper and lower limbs the facial sheath, delegation of the different levels. Topographical anatomy of the sciatic nerve. Technic of sciatic nerve and of popliteal vessels exposure.
  4. To do: a pleural  punctures,  pericardial,  peritoneal,  bladder  aspiration; gastroraphy, suture of large and small intestinal wounds; make an amputation and exarticulation.

CONTENT OF COURSE:

Surgical anatomy of a shoulder joint. Technic of the vessels and nerves exposure (axillary,subclavian). Theirs projection line. Phlegmon section. Brachial deligation. The elbow joint puncture and arthrotomy. Technic of the vessels and nerves exposure.The topographical anatomy of a forearm, wrist and hand region. Phlegmon and agnail i-rctions. The vessels and nerves exposure. The surgical anatomy of hip joint. Technic of femoral deligation of the defferent levels. Topographycal anatomy of lower limb. Technic of the vessels and nerves exposure. The general principles of the amputation and exarticulation.

Tendon suture, nerven suture, neurolysis. Vascular suture. Topography of the head region. Operative surgery of a skull. Cranio-ccerebral tocography on Krenlein-Brysev of cranium. Primary surgical processing of cranial wounds. Drreoplastic and decompressive (resection) cranial trepanation. Features of primary surgical srocessing of wounds of face. Cuts at phlegmons of the face. Topography thyroid and parathyroid glands, larynx, trachea, pharinx and gullet. Topographical anatomy of chest wall and organs of chest cavity. Topographical anatomy of the anterior abdominal wall. Operations on anterior abdominal wall: technics and kinds laparatomy, operations at umblical hernias and hernias of a mea alba. Operations at inquinal and femoral hernias. Topography of organs of the abdominal cavity. Operations on a stomach, a duodenum, a iiver, a biliary duct, a pancreas, a spleen. Operations on a inferior floor of a abdominal cavity.Topography of organs of uric system. Operation on a kidneys and a ureter. Topography of vertebral collumn. Operations of the vertebral collumn.  

METHODS OF ESTIMATION: oral interview, testing, written examination.

LITERATURE

  1. Short practice of surgery. Russell. R.C.,Normans.S., Williams. First Britain in 1932 Volume 1. First edition Great Britain in 1932. .24 th in London 2004.
  2. Essential surgical practice. Alfred Cuschieri., Robert I.C., Abdool Rahim Moossa. Fourth edition. 2002. 

MED 206,  HYGIENE

GOAL:  studying  by students’  the  basics  of environmental  health,  occupational  health,

nutrition hygiene and prevention of infectious and non-infectious diseases.

STUDENTS SHOULD DEMONSTRATE THE ABILITY TO:

  1. To measure   physical   and  chemical   indicators  for  the   water  and  make   hygienic assessment of drinking water quality.
  2. To measure atmospheric air parameters and make hygienic assessment of air quality.
  3. То  determine  sanitary  indicators  for the  soil  and  make  hygienic  assessment  of soil quality.
  4. To conduct  radiological  measurements  and  make  hygienic  assessment  of  radiation
  5. To make assessment of the dietary/nutritional status of the population.
  6. To measure adverse factors of the work environment and  make hygienic assessment of working conditions.
  7. To   master  healthy   life-style  and   personal   hygiene   skills  and  to   conduct   health education among the population.
  8. To use modern technologies and approaches in the  learning process and subsequent labor activity.

MED 204, SOCIAL MEDICINE AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT

GOAL: teach students public health development, health economics and planning.

STUDENT SHOULD KNOW:

  1. Basic issues of health economic and planning,
  2. Basic issues of public health development and health promotion.

STUDENTS SHOULD BE SKILLED IN:

  1. Parametric methods of statistical research outcomes assessment.
  2. Indexes standardization methods.
  3. Public health study methods.
  4. Demographic development study methods.

CONTENT OF COURSE:

Therapeutic service management in polyclinic setting. Familiarization with therapeutic division performance, work management of district doctor and nurse. Specifics of district doctor’s work in polyclinic setting (collection of anamnesis, specifics of patient examination, dispensary groups formation principle etc.) District doctor’s  documentation. Temporary working incapability expertise, its specific objectives and legislative directives. Modern methods of examination and treatm ent in polyclinic  settings.  Familiarization with examinations methodologies at Diagnostics Centre and with work at inpatient settings (operated during daylight). Thematic seeing by-case of patients with various therapeutic diseases. Specifics of development and treatm ent of somatic diseases in elderly and senile people. The role of polyclinic general practitioner in observation of adolescents with regard for physiological specifics of this age. Somatic diseases development and treatment during  pregnancy  and  mission  of polyclinic general practitioner. Neurocirculatory system in practice of polyclinic general practitioner. Rehabilitation of myocard infarction patients at polyclinic stage of treatm ent. Somatic aspects of alcoholism. Interaction of district general practitioner with other specialists. The situation and modern trends. Statistical  research  organization. Medico-social aspects of demography. Morbidity in population. Basics of assistance to population in treatm ent and health promotion. Maternity and childhood protection. Sanitation and epidemiology service. Modern problems of prophylaxis. Most commonly occurring diseases and their medico-social significance. Organization of medical assistance for diseases of cardiovascular system, respiratory organs, digestive organs, ггоэслп е system; neuro-psychic and infectious diseases, malignant tumors, traumatism,  acm olism , drug abuse and toxicomania. Current problems of health  economics, planning and finance.

METHODS OF ESTIMATION: oral interview, testing, written examination.

LITERATURE:

  1. Principles of Community Dr. B. Shidhar Rao. – 1990
  2. Public Health Administration Lloid F. Novick Glen P. Mays 2001

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